A Foundation Of Financial Fairness

Child support and spousal support (also known as alimony) are extremely important parts of the divorce process. The law attempts to achieve a fair result for everyone involved.

At our law firm, we take the time to make sure you understand the likely outcomes of your case from the very beginning so there are no surprises along the way. New Jersey Supreme Court-Certified Matrimonial Attorney Robin Jill Schneider has more than 30 years of experience helping people in Middlesex, Monmouth and Ocean counties in New Jersey work through complex support issues.

Parents And Children Depend On Child Support

Many parents in New Jersey depend on child support to provide for their children. Full and timely child support payments ensure that a child receives necessities like education, food and shelter, and medical care. Robin Jill Schneider has experience helping parents in Middlesex, Monmouth and Ocean counties work out child support agreements that are fair and meet the needs of the child and the custodial parent.

How Is Child Support Determined And Enforced?

New Jersey courts consider several criteria when determining the amount of child support a noncustodial parent should pay. Some of them are:

  • The incomes of both parents
  • The number of overnights a child spends at each parent's home
  • Whether a parent or child collects government benefits
  • The costs of child care and health insurance for the child
  • The child's extraordinary expenses, including special health care expenses and expenses for traveling sports teams such as hockey, dance or cheerleading
  • College expenses

A judge may change a child support order over time, due to changes in circumstances. In addition, sometimes a parent does not make his or her court-ordered child support payments, which can make life difficult for the custodial parent. We can work with you to enforce your support order.

Determining Spousal Support

Although New Jersey does not use a specific formula for determining alimony, judges consider several statutory factors, including the following:

  • Length of the marriage
  • Income, earning capacity and employability of each spouse
  • Contributions, financial and nonfinancial, of each spouse to the marriage, including child-rearing responsibilities
  • The health of the parties
  • Time and expense required for the receiving spouse to become financially independent
  • Age of each spouse

These factors also play a role in which of the five types of alimony you may be awarded or ordered to pay. The five types are:

  • Temporary alimony, which is payable during the divorce process
  • Limited duration alimony, which is paid for a specific time period
  • Rehabilitative alimony, which provides compensation for education, training and other expenses to help the dependent spouse become self-supporting
  • Reimbursement alimony, which reimburses one spouse who supported the other through school, but did not benefit from the education because of the divorce
  • Open duration alimony, which is for dependent spouses who may never become self-supporting

Relevant factors can change over time. If that happens, a judge may be willing to modify alimony.

Call For A Free Consultation Now

It is essential to work with an attorney who understands current laws and how they may change in the future. Robin Jill Schneider is such an attorney. Call 732-812-4944 or contact us online.